Inspiration ~ Gatherings from Ireland # 98

New Page at Garrarus Beach, Tramore, Co. Waterford
New Page at Garrarus Beach, Tramore, Co. Waterford

I’m intrigued by the world of writing, and ahead of the Waterford Writers’ Weekend which starts today, I have been thinking about inspiration and where it comes from.

http://www.waterfordcity.ie/library/iguana/www.main.cls?surl=WW

For me, I think it derives very much from nature and the lovely surroundings here in Tramore, Co. Waterford. How could one not be inspired by the sea, the ebb and flow of the tide,  gulls calling, daffodils in bud, in bloom, knocked over by the wind, the pigeons nesting in the monkey puzzle in the garden, driftwood on the shore, the bluebells getting ready to bloom …..

But writers write in all sorts of places and more than anything, I have been captivated, of late, by the way in which the trees in Newtown Wood, just outside Tramore, have thrust the concept of ‘frames’ in front of me.  Really, we see life through frames ~ be they nature, time, people, food, music, film,  memories, everyday snippets of conversation ….. the list is endless.

Framing Life at Newtown Wood, Tramore, Co. Waterford.
Framing Life at Newtown Wood, Tramore, Co. Waterford.

Where does your inspiration come from?

Waterford Writers’ Weekend 2013 ~ Gatherings from Ireland # 78

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The dawning of March brings heightened anticipation of  Waterford Writers’ Weekend which takes place from March 21st-24th. This year’s line-up of readings, workshops and events is akin to all the spring buds just bursting to reveal their fresh colours, creativity and inspiration.

http://www.waterfordcity.ie/library/iguana/www.main.cls?surl=WW

The spirit of Sean Dunne ( 1956-1995), arguably Waterford’s greatest ever poet, is fundamental to the Writers’ Weekend and I would like to bring you one of his poems which I particularly love:

Prayer

by

Sean Dunne

King of Sunday, guard the wells

and streams. Preserve the woods.

King of Monday, guard the cry

of corncrakes in the mown meadow.

King of  Tuesday, let live the frail

petals in limestone landscapes.

King of Wednesday, spare the thin

grass where herds of reindeer feed.

King of Thursday, care for the low

cries of field mice after harvest.

King of Friday, care for the surge

of salmon beneath a Corrib bridge.

King of Saturday, attend the birds:

oiled wings flapping; their clogged throats. 

 from Collected: Sean Dunne  (2005) Gallery Press