My Ireland

You’ve got to understand that the mere mention of the word Ireland conjures up very different images in people’s minds ~ everything from greenness to Guinness.

As I was driving to Kilfarrasy Beach here in Co. Waterford for a dip this morning, this was the image of Ireland that presented itself to me:

The Grey Horse
The Grey Horse

Yes, a grey horse looking seaward with its mane billowing ever so gently. Horses are an integral part of the landscape right around the Irish countryside. I always feel a sense of incredible good fortune to be part of that countryside and to be able to touch nature with such ease.

The thought of being stuck in the middle of a bustling city with no hope of ever seeing green fields and grey horses fills me with dread and I know there are many Irish people, not to talk about people living in far flung metropolises, who never get the chances that I do to commune with nature in all her glory.

What image flashes before you when you hear the word “Ireland?”

Author: socialbridge

I am a sociologist and writer from Ireland. I have worked as a social researcher for 30 years and have had a lifelong passion for writing. My main research interests relate to health care and I love to write both non-fiction and poetry.

38 thoughts on “My Ireland”

  1. Funny you should say that. I don’t think of Ireland having big cities as such…weird but I don’t. I see Ireland as green as this is the pictures of what we have seen. I do envision a country side and some parts of Ireland fog and wet. Now I will probably go and look up Ireland on the internet.

    1. Oh we have our cities alright. Dublin ‘can be heaven’ as the song goes.
      It will be interesting to hear what version of Ireland comes across in the internet. I feel it’s a country that could be viewed, perceived and experienced in a zillion different ways.

      1. They showed the bank of foyles. Most of the tourism was about the jagged cliffs being the coastline. Very dramatic. I didn’t see any big cities. I didn’t know Ireland was an island and that it was split in two. Northern Ireland and the republic of Ireland. How does that work? They showed the countryside mostly. Castles of course. My doctor is from Ireland. He speaks so fast with an accent and sometimes he forgets to slow. One time I interrupted him and said bedoo bedoo bedoo. He asked me what was that and I politely said that is all I hear when you speak rapidly. The other thing he keeps me in his office talking about intellectual subjects. They are only supposed to keep us in their office for 10 minutes. I can be there up to 30 minutes. He always says he will catch up. Interesting fella. I’m sure there are more to glean of Ireland but it is 3:00 ish in the morning my time and it is time to go to bed. Have a great day.

        1. That’s fun about your Irish doc. I hope he provides great care.
          Yes, Ireland is divided with 6 counties in the North being part of the United Kingdom. It has caused considerable strife over the years but thankfully peace reigns now.

  2. “Ireland” conjures up Dublin, Bloomsbury, villages, links to wonderful crafts like knitting, tatting and writing, rich culture with myths and legends, my Dad’s hurling, my two Grandmothers, who I think were amazing women and yet I know so little about them, which of course, means mystery. I think that is what Ireland is for me – mystery – and wonderful hard working people. I don’t know why but I always feel inspired after I visit this site:):)
    Olga

    1. Olga, that’s very interesting that ‘mystery’ is a part of what you associate with Ireland. I hope you can somehow get to learn more about your grandmothers.
      I’m honoured to hear that Social Bridge is a source of inspiration to you. Thanks!

  3. Rolling greens and stone walls ..quaint cottages with thatched roofs..sheep and the lovely creations from their wool…Irish wit…the music..the dancing..so much more..I love the Irish castles and the landscape…

  4. Now, when someone says Ireland or Irish, I think of you as the first person who pops in my head, then i would love to march along that unique and natural green scenery. I woudn’t mind neither to visit one crowded city :).

    1. Ah thanks, Dana. I think the Irish countryside would appeal to you greatly if your own photography is anything to go by. We certainly have some lovely cities so you’ll have good choice there.

  5. I have never been to Ireland, Jean, and I’m not sure if I’ll get the chance, but my version of beauty and contentment would be the same as yours. The city is fun for visiting, but country and ocean with their gorgeous animals can’t be replaced by traffic noises and hustle and bustle. Your photo is gorgeous, too. I’m rambling this morning, hoping this makes sense. 🙂

    1. I thought I’d see sheep in your list alright. Passed a field with two lovely black ones in amongst about fifty whites the other day. I’ll have to go back and try and find them. Hubby was driving and I suspect he was right that it was too dark for moooore pics!

          1. LoL … yup! Buffalo on the farming range, not roaming free 😉 We have friends who raise buffalo… Oh, and we ‘ve seen moose in the open field behind our house. One moose even tried to climb our next-door neighbour’s fence, once! 🙂 ♥ ❤

  6. I always think of Ben Bulben. This is what would have been my parents’ backdrop. I can’t imagine anything more beautiful.

  7. Green fields, stonewalls, ancient castles, and Guinness of course! I love the cozy pubs and the music too but it’s mostly the green fields that come to mind first. I worked in an Irish pub over here back during college and the music is now ingrained in my head.

  8. Some great comments here Jean. I suppose I’ve always been too close to Ireland to be objective about my impressions. However (and slightly off-topic) I’ve always ‘known’ that I’m home as soon as I arrive in Cork. Since that realisation I’ve read that the author Pete McCarthy (no relation) and the musician Kurt Cobain had exactly the same strange feeling about Cork. There’s no doubt Ireland is a place like no other.

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