Joy at Low Tide

I love the nakedness associated with low tide ~ the revealing of hidden treasures.

Low tide at many of the beaches in Co. Waterford is the time whole beaches open up and one can round corners that are cut off at full tide.

The other day, I deliberately waited until low tide to go to Garrarus and climbing the cliffs to see the bare coastline was on my mind.

It was one of those glorious sunny afternoons and here’s how the beach looked as I headed for the cliffs:

Gararus Beach, Co. Waterford
Gararus Beach, Co. Waterford

It was pure heaven up on the cliffs with Summer wafting all round ~ crickets cricketing, seagulls gliding, taste of salt in the air; scents of sea, seaweed and purity.

Looking back over Garrarus, the beach looked far bigger than it usually does when I’ve got swimming on my mind:

Garrarus Beach towards Tramore
Garrarus Beach towards Tramore

Looking South in all senses, the low tide revealed the hidden beaches that lie between Garrarus and Kilfarrassy. Golden sand and gentle white waves breaking ever so gently; sea arches and jaggedy rocks ….

Garrarus towards Kilfarrassy Beach, Co. Waterford
Garrarus towards Kilfarrassy Beach, Co. Waterford

Lying on the soft grass among the flowers, sipping cool apple juice, I saw tiny indentations on the map come alive and stamp their absolute uniqueness on my coastalised heart.

Author: socialbridge

I am a sociologist and writer from Ireland. I have worked as a social researcher for 30 years and have had a lifelong passion for writing. My main research interests relate to health care and I love to write both non-fiction and poetry.

18 thoughts on “Joy at Low Tide”

  1. Beautiful Jean. I was born and raised in Nova Scotia and the north shore is on the Bay of Fundy. This has some of the highest tides in the world – over 50 feet vertical. There are also very strong currents. This combination makes for some amazing discoveries at low tide. It is one of the premiere rock collecting areas in Canada with amethyst, jasper, agate, etc. The cliffs with these deposits are under 50 feet of water at high tide, and pounded by currents. So, even from one low tide to another the landscape changes dramatically – uncovering veins of precious rock and then covering them back up. I used to love walking the base of the cliffs at low tide and picking up rocks that looked promising. I had quite a rock collection when I was young.

    I know you were appreciating the beauty Jean, and yet even for those of us who are just curious, the low tides are a draw to an unseen world that only appears occasionally and continually changes.

    Great Post Jean. Thank You.

  2. Beautiful description..a lovely day at the beach and all that it beholds..a place to roam with out limitations..

  3. Crickets cricketing! Your words bring the land- and seascape to a bright and quivering present. I miss the coastline: it is too seldom that I make the pilgrimage, but my resolve is affirmed. The bare coastline’s nakedness at low tide is a powerful observation – it very aptly evokes that marked difference in aspect. Wonderful post!

  4. “Lying on the soft grass among the flowers, sipping cool apple juice, I saw tiny indentations on the map come alive and stamp their absolute uniqueness on my coastalised heart.”
    Thank you for sharing this wonderful poetic and moment Jean ๐Ÿ™‚

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